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Jane Alexander Bio, Wiki, Age, Height, Husband, Books, Net Worth, Son And Movies? The 47 Top Answers

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Jane Alexander Biography

Jane Alexander Quigley is an American actress and author, best known for her role in the Broadway production of The Great White Hope. In addition, Jane served as Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts from 1993 to 1997.

Jane Alexander Age

Alexander is 81 years old in 2020, she was born on October 28, 1939 in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. She celebrates her birthday on October 28th every year and her birth sign is Scorpio. Jane will be 82 years old on October 28, 2021.

Jane Alexander Height

Alexander stands at a height of 5 feet 7.5 inches (1.71 m).

Jane Alexander Weight

Alexander weighs 140 pounds (63 kg).

Jane Alexander Education

Alexander is a graduate of Beaver Country Day School. In addition, Jane entered Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville. Jane also studied mathematics. Alexander studied her junior school education at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Jane Alexander Parents

Jane’s parents are Ruth Elizabeth, née Pearson), a registered nurse, and Thomas B. Quigley, an orthopedist. It is also not known if she has siblings.

We will update this section as soon as this information becomes available.

Jane Alexander Husband

Jane’s first husband was Robert Alexander and together they were blessed with two children. Robert and Jane married in 1962 but later divorced in 1974. In 1975 Jane married Edwin Sherin but he died in 2017. While Jane was married to Edwin they were blessed with three sons, Tony, Geoffry and Jon.

Jane Alexander Son, Jace Alexander

Jace Alexander was born in 1964. Jace Alexander, the son of Jane and Robert Alexander, is an American director and actor. Jace has starred in I’m Not Rappaport, Six Degrees of Separation and the Stephen Sondheim musical Assassins, where he portrayed Lee Harvey Oswald.

Jace is married to his actress wife, Maddie Corman, and together they are blessed with three children. He is 56 years old in 2020 and was born on April 7, 1964 in New York City, New York, USA.

Jane Alexander Net Worth

Alexander has an estimated net worth of $10 million as of 2020. This includes their assets, money and income. Her main source of income is her career as an actress. Through his various sources of income, Jane has been able to amass a good fortune but prefers to lead a modest life.

Jane Alexander Measurements and Facts

Here are some interesting facts and body measurements to know about Jane:

Jane Alexander Wiki

Full Names: Jane Alexander Quigley.

Popular as: Jane Alexander.

Gender Female.

Profession / Profession: Actress.

Nationality: American.

Race/Ethnicity: White.

Religion: update.

Sexual orientation: Hetero.

Jane Alexander Birthday

Age / How old?: 81 years (2020).

Zodiac sign: Scorpio.

Date of birth: October 28, 1939.

Place of Birth: Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Birthday: October 28th.

Jane’s Body Measurements

Body measurements: update.

Height / How tall?: 5ft 7.5in (1.71m.

Weight: 63kg (140lbs).

Eye color: dark brown.

Hair color: grey.

Shoe size: update.

Dress size: update.

Breast size update.

Waist size: update.

Hips: update.

Jane Alexander Family and Relationship

Father (Father): Thomas B. Quigley.

Mother: Ruth Elizabeth (née Pearson).

Siblings (brothers and sisters): update.

Marital status Unmarried.

Ex-Husband/Spouse: Edwin Sherin (1975-2017) and Robert Alexander (1962-1974).

Dating / Boyfriend: Not applicable.

Children: four.

Jane Alexander Net Worth and Salary

Net worth: $10 million.

Salary: Under review.

Source of income: actress.

Jane’s House and Cars

Resence: Will be updated.

Cars: Car brand is updated.

Jane Alexander Actress

Alexander began to shine in acting in 1967 when she played Eleanor Backman in the original production of Howard Sackler’s The Great White Hope at the Arena Stage in Washington, DC. Like her co-star James Earl Jones, she played the role both on Broadway (1968), for which she won a Tony Award, and in the film version (1970), for which she received an Oscar nomination.

The play The Time of Your Life resumed at the Huntington Hartford Theater in Los Angeles on March 17, 1972, starring Alexander, Henry Fonda, Gloria Grahame, Lewis J. Stadlen, Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Thompson, Strother Martin and Richard X. Slattery, and Pepper Martin under the cast, co-directed with Edwin Sherin.

Alexander portrayed Eleanor Roosevelt in two television productions, Eleanor and Franklin (1976) and Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years (1977); She also played FDR’s mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt, in HBO’s Warm Springs (2005) with Kenneth Branagh and Cynthia Nixon, a role that earned her an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Jane Alexander Books

Spirit of the Home: How to make your home a sanctuary.

The Energy Secret.

Ancient wisdom for modern life.

A user manual for appearances.

The incense and blessing book.

Wild things, wild places.

The Natural Year.

The Last Treasure Hunt.

Five Minute Healer.

The Energy Secret.

Detox plan: cleansing of body, mind and emotions.

The Original Bluefish Cookbook.

Rituals for a holy life.

The Weekend Healer: Over a dozen 3-day plans to relax, de-stress, and re-energize.

Mind, Body, Spirit: A Complete Gue to Holistic Therapies.

Spike the black wolf.

well-being and mindfulness.

new spirit.

The spot.

Science power 10. Resource folder for teachers.

Jane Alexander Movies and TV Shows

Movies

1970

White Hope as Eleanor Backman.

1971

A Gunfight as Nora Tenneray.

1972

The New Centurions as Dorothy Fehler.

1976

All the Present’s Men as Judy Hoback Miller.

1978

The Betsy as Alicia Hardeman.

1979

Kramer vs. Kramer as Margaret Phelps.

1980

Brubaker as Lillian Gray.

1982

Night Crossing as Doris Strelzyk.

1983

Will as Carol Weatherly.

1984

City Heat as Addy.

1987

Sweet Country as Anna.

Square Dance as Janelle King.

1989

Fame as Sarah Blake Sturgis Shaw.

1999

The Cer House Rules as Nurse Edna.

2002

Sunshine State as Delia Temple.

The Ring as Dr. Grasnik.

2006

Fur: ​​An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus as Gertrude Nemerov.

2007

Feast of Love as Esther Stevenson.

2008

Gigantic like Mrs. Weathersby.

2009

The Unborn as Sofi Kozma.

Terminator Salvation as Virginia.

2011

Dream House as Dr. Greeley.

2013

Mr. Morgan’s Last Love as Joan Morgan.

2017

Three Christs as Dr. Abraham.

TV Shows

1969

N.Y.P.D.

Adam-12 as Flo the Archivist.

1972

Welcome Home, Johnny Bristol as Anne Palmer.

1973

Miracle on 34th Street as Karen Walker.

1974

This is the west that was as Sarah Shaw.

1975

Death Is Not Proud as Frances Gunther.

1976

Eleanor and Franklin as Eleanor Roosevelt, ages 18–60.

1977

Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years as Eleanor Roosevelt.

A Circle of Children as Mary MacCracken.

1978

A Matter of Love as Barbara Moreland.

Lovey: A Circle of Children Part II as Mary MacCracken.

1980

Play for time as Alma Rose.

1981

Better a liar than Mrs. Patrick Campbell.

1982

Stranger Custody as Sandy Caldwell.

1984

When She Says No as Nora Strangis.

Calamity Jane as Martha Jane “Calamity Jane” Canary.

1985

Malice in Wonderland as Hedda Hopper.

1986

Blood & Orchs as Doris Ashley.

1987

In Love and War as Sybil Stockdale.

1988

A Friendship in Vienna as Hannah Dournenvald.

Open admissions as Ginny Carlsen.

1990

Daughter of the Streets as Peggy Ryan.

1991

A Marriage: Georgia O’Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz as Georgia O’Keeffe.

1992

Stay the night as Blanche Kettman.

1993

New Year as Elsie Robertson.

2000

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit as Regina Mulroney.

2001

Jennifer as Marilyn Estess.

Bitter winter.

2004

Freedom: A Story of Us as Jane Addams.

Take me home as Mrs. Gortimer.

2005

Warm Springs as Sara Delano Roosevelt.

2006

The Way as Helen Warden.

2007

Tell me you love me as Dr. May Foster.

2008

Louisa May Alcott as Ednah Cheney.

2011

Deck the halls as Nora Regan Reilly.

2011–2015

The Good Wife as Judge Suzanne Morris.

2011

William & Catherine: A Royal Romance as Queen Elizabeth II

2013–2014

The Black List as Diane Fowler.

2013

Forgive me as a bookmaker.

2014

The Dive as Elizabeth.

2014–2016

Elementary like C

2015

The Book of Negroes as Maria Witherspoon.

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Forever as Nora Morgan.

2017–2018

The Good Fight as Judge Suzanne Morris.

2019

Modern Love as Margot.

2020

Stories from the Loop as Klara.

Frequently Asked Questions About Jane Alexander

Who is Jane Alexander?

Jane is an acclaimed actress and writer who received critical acclaim for her performance in the Broadway production of The Great White Hope.

How old is Jane Alexander?

Jane is an American citizen born on October 28, 1939 in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.

How tall is Jane Alexander?

Jane stands at a height of 5 feet 7.5 inches (1.71 m)

Is Jane Alexander married?

Jane’s first husband was Robert Alexander and together they were blessed with two children. Robert and Jane married in 1962 but later divorced in 1974. In 1975, Jane married Edwin Sherin, but he died in 2017.

How much is Jane Alexander worth?

Jane has an approximate net worth of $10 million. This amount comes from her leading roles in the entertainment industry.

Where does Jane live?

For security reasons, Jane has not shared her exact whereabouts. We will update this information when we receive the location and pictures of your home.

Is Jane dead or alive?

Alexander is alive and in good health. There were no reports that she was ill or had any health problems.

Where is Alexander now?

Jane Alexander Quigley is an American actress and author, best known for her role in the Broadway production of The Great White Hope. In addition, Jane served as Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts from 1993 to 1997.

Jane Alexander Social Media Contacts

Facebook.

Related Biographies.

You may also want to read Bio, Career, Family, Relationship, Measurements, Net worth, Achievements and more about:

Alexander Elling.

Reference:

We acknowledge the following websites that we referenced when writing this article:

Wikipedia.

IMDB.

Facebook.

Twitter.

Instagram and.

youtube.

Who is Jane Alexander married to?

She was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1999. In 2004, Alexander, together with her husband, Edwin Sherin, joined the theater faculty at Florida State University.

How old is Jane Alexander?

How tall is Jane Alexander?

Where is Jane Alexander?

Alexander attended the University of the Witwatersrand, where she obtained a bachelor’s degree and a Master of Arts in Fine Arts in 1982 and 1988. Currently, she is senior lecturer of sculpture, photography and Drawing at Michaelis school of fine art in Cape Town where she has taught since 1998.

Where was Jane Alexander born?

How old is Jane Seymour?

When was Jane Alexander born?

Who is Jane the Virgin actress?

Đức trinh nữ/Actresses

What movies did Jane Alexander play in?

Jane Alexander/Appears in

Who did Jane Alexander play in the blacklist?

The Blacklist (TV Series 2013– ) – Jane Alexander as Diane Fowler – IMDb.

Is Jason Alexander related to Jane Alexander?

Alexander was born Jason Alexander in New York City, the only son of actress Jane Alexander and her first husband Robert, founder and former director of Living Stage Theatre Company.

Who is the famous artist in South Africa?

William Kentridge is South Africa’s most popular and famous artist. He works with an assortment of mediums including print, painting, sculpture, and movie, his artworks have been shown at New York’s MOMA and the Louver in Paris.

What is Jane Alexander known for?

Biography. Jane Alexander (born 1959) is one of the most celebrated artists in South Africa. She is a female artist best known for her sculpture, The Butcher Boys. She works in sculpture, photomontages, photography and video.

Who is Manfred Zylla?

Manfred Zylla, was born in Augsburg, Germany in 1939, and arrived in South Africa in 1970. A series of woodcuts about the 1976 Soweto uprising, and the creation of large-scale drawings, prints and paintings in the unstable 1980’s gave him a name as an artist highly critical of apartheid.


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Faith Lianne Model Bio, Wikipedia, Age, Weight, Height, Family, Facts and Networth
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While Jane was married to Edwin they were blessed with three sons, Tony, Geoffry, and Jon. Jane Alexander Son, Jace Alexander. Jace Alexander was born in 1964.

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Jane Alexander – Wikipedia

Jane Alexander (née Quigley; born October 28, 1939) is an American actress and author. She is the recipient of two Primetime Emmy Awards, a Tony Award, …

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Age, Biography and Wiki. Jane Alexander (Jane Seyferth Quigley) was born on 28 October, 1939 in Boston, MA, is an American actress.

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Jane Alexander was born on 29 March 1959 in England, United Kingdom. Jane Alexander age is 61 years as of in 2021 and his birthplace is England, …

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Jane Alexander

This article is about the American actress. For other people with the same name, see Jane Alexander (disambiguation)

American actress

Jane Alexander (née Quigley; born October 28, 1939)[1] is an American actress and author. She has received two Primetime Emmy Awards, a Tony Award, and nominations for four Academy Awards and three Golden Globe Awards. From 1993 to 1997, Alexander served as Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Alexander won the 1969 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for her performance in the Broadway production of The Great White Hope. Other Broadway credits include 6 Rms Riv Vu (1972), The Night of the Iguana (1988), The Sisters Rosensweig (1993) and Honor (1998). She received a total of eight Tony Award nominations and was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 1994.[2]

Her film breakthrough came with the romantic drama The Great White Hope (1970), which earned her an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Her subsequent Academy Award nominations were for her roles in All the President’s Men (1976), Kramer vs. Kramer (1979), and Testament (1983). An eight-time Emmy nominee, she received her first nomination for playing Eleanor Roosevelt in Eleanor and Franklin (1976), a role for which she had to be between the ages of 18 and 60. She has won two Emmys for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie for Playing for Time (1980) and Warm Springs (2005).

Early life[edit]

Alexander was born Jane Quigley in Boston, Massachusetts to Ruth Elizabeth (née Pearson), a registered nurse, and Thomas B. Quigley, an orthopedic surgeon. She graduated from Beaver Country Day School, an all-girls school in Chestnut Hill outside of Boston, where she discovered her love for acting.[4]

Encouraged by her father to go to college before pursuing an acting career, Alexander attended Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, where she focused on theater but also studied math with computer programming in mind should she fail as an actress. Also during her time with Sarah Lawrence, she shared an apartment with Hope Cooke, who would become Queen Consort of Sikkim. Alexander spent her junior year at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland where she attended the Edinburgh University Dramatic Society. The experience cemented her determination to continue acting.[4]

Career [edit]

Alexander made her Broadway debut in 1963, replacing Phyllis Wynn as Sandy Dennis’ standby in A Thousand Clowns. She reportedly played the role a few times.[5] Alexander’s big break in acting came in 1967 when she played Eleanor Backman in the original production of Howard Sackler’s The Great White Hope at the Arena Stage in Washington, DC. Like her co-star James Earl Jones, she played the role both on Broadway (1968), for which she won a Tony Award, and in the film version (1970), for which she received an Oscar nomination.[6 ] See Alexander’s other screen credits include All the President’s Men (1976), Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) and Testament (1983), all of which earned her Oscar nominations, Brubaker (1980), The Cider House Rules (1999) and Fur (2006), in which she played Gertrude Nemerov, mother of Diane Arbus, played in the film by Nicole Kidman.

The play The Time of Your Life was revived at the Huntington Hartford Theater in Los Angeles on March 17, 1972, starring Alexander, Henry Fonda, Gloria Grahame, Lewis J. Stadlen, Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Thompson, Strother Martin, Richard X. Slattery, and Pepper Martin among the cast directed by Edwin Sherin.[7][8]

Alexander portrayed Eleanor Roosevelt in two television productions, Eleanor and Franklin (1976) and Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years (1977); She also played FDR’s mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt, in HBO’s Warm Springs (2005) with Kenneth Branagh and Cynthia Nixon, a role that earned her an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Alexander co-starred with Rachel Roberts in Steven Gether’s television play and production of A Circle of Children (1977), based on Mary MacCracken’s autobiographical book about emotionally disturbed children (with a focus on autism), which earned Gether an Emmy. Alexander also starred in the sequel Lovey: A Circle of Children, Part II (1978).

In 1979, the Supersisters trading card set was produced and distributed; one of the cards contained Alexander’s name and picture.[9]

Alexander’s other television films include Arthur Miller’s Playing for Time, starring Vanessa Redgrave, for which Alexander won another Emmy Award; Malice in Wonderland (as famous gossip Hedda Hopper); blood & orchids; and In Love and War (1987), starring James Woods, which tells the story of James and Sybil Stockdale during Stockdale’s eight-year US captivity in Vietnam. Alexander also played the protagonist Dr. May Foster on the HBO drama series Tell Me You Love Me. Her character, a psychotherapist, serves as a link between three couples struggling with relationship and sexual difficulties. The show’s overt depiction of “older” sexuality and explicit sex scenes caused controversy, although it received a rare endorsement from the AARP. She also had a supporting role as Dr. Graznik in The Ring.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed Alexander to chair the National Endowment for the Arts, the organization that had partially funded The Great White Hope at Arena Stage. Alexander moved to Washington, DC and served as NEA Chair until 1997. Her book Command Performance: an Actress in the Theater of Politics (2000) describes the challenges she faced in leading the NEA when the 104th US Congress, led by Newt Gingrich, endeavored unsuccessful in closing it.[4] In 1999 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[10]

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In 2004, Alexander joined the theater department at Florida State University with her husband Edwin Sherin.[11] She serves on various bodies including the Wildlife Conservation Society, National Audubon Society, Project Greenhope, National Stroke Association and Women’s Action for Nuclear Disarmament, and has received the Israel Cultural Award and the Helen Caldicott Leadership Award. Alexander is also a Fellow of the International Leadership Forum.[13] In 2009, Alexander starred in Thom Thomas’ play A Moon to Dance By at the Pittsburgh Playhouse and the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Her husband Edwin Sherin directed the film.

Personal life[edit]

Alexander met her first husband, Robert Alexander, in New York City in the early 1960s, where both were pursuing acting careers. They had a son, Jace Alexander, in 1964 and the couple divorced a decade later. Alexander was a regular in various regional theaters when she met producer/director Edwin Sherin in Washington, DC where he was Artistic Director at Arena Stage. Alexander starred in the original theatrical production of The Great White Hope, directed by Sherin, on the Arena Stage prior to the play’s Broadway debut. The two became good friends and, after divorcing their respective spouses, became romantically involved and married in 1975. Together they have four children, Alexander’s son Jace and Sherin’s three sons Tony, Geoffrey and Jon. [4] Edwin Sherin died on May 4, 2017 at the age of 87.[14][15]

Filmography [ edit ]

Alexander in the 1960s

movie [edit]

television [edit]

stage [ edit ]

References[edit]

Jane Alexander (artist)

South African artist

Jane Alexander (born 1959)[1] is one of South Africa’s most celebrated artists.[2][3] She is an artist best known for her sculpture The Butcher Boys. She works in the fields of sculpture, photomontage, photography and video. Alexander is interested in human behavior, historical conflicts, cultural memories of abuse and the lack of global interference during apartheid.[4][5][6] Alexander’s work is relevant both in the current post-apartheid social environment in South Africa and abroad.[7][5][6][8][9][2]

Biography[edit]

Alexander was born in 1959 in Johannesburg, South Africa. She grew up in the early 1980s at the height of South African apartheid.[5][8] Growing up in apartheid South Africa, Alexander was sheltered from police and street violence at the time until she moved to Braamfotein, South Africa to be closer to her university. Apartheid – an Afrikaans word for “separateness” – was a system of racial segregation in South Africa that existed from 1948 to 1994. Apartheid legislation created separate educational institutions based on a person’s skin color. Art classes were included in the curriculum for whites, but not for blacks or Indians. In 1959, the law decreed that only whites could pursue arts education at universities or technical schools. In the late 1970s, art had to choose between focusing on form over content or fighting apartheid through art. From 1985 to 1989 – during the state of emergency – white artists like Alexander had greater freedom to challenge apartheid and make the rest of the world aware of it through their art.[10]

Her interest in these subjects influenced her later installations and artworks.[11] Inspired early in her career by the figurative work of George Segal, Ed and Nancy Kienholz, Duane Hanson and David Goldblatt.[2] Alexander attended the University of the Witwatersrand, where she earned a Bachelor’s degree and a Master of Arts in Fine Arts in 1982 and 1988 respectively.[1] She is currently a lecturer in sculpture, photography and drawing at the Michaelis School of Fine Art in Cape Town, where she has taught since 1998.[5][1][12]

Artist process[ edit ]

Mangled by the violence of apartheid, Alexander’s plays often contain contrasting themes such as attraction and repulsion, human and animal, and the grotesque yet vulnerable.[13][8] The human-animal in their work can be seen as the inhumane nature of apartheid society.[14] The distinctions in Alexander’s work between the victim and the perpetrator, the oppressor and the oppressed are blurred.[13][7] Their hybrid forms suggest the normalization of the grotesque motors of violence like apartheid and the ability of ordinary individuals to become ruthless aggressors when they become part of a collective with an agenda of oppression and violence.[7][5] These grotesque figures frighten us not because they are inhuman, but because they are so fundamentally human.[5] Alexander’s work also demonstrates the potential for human resilience, empowerment, and dignity in the face of violence, adversity, and oppression, as well as the insecurity and fear of those in power.[13][14][7] Her human-animals warn of the consequences of history and point to possible futures.[5][8] Her work portrays politically and socially charged characters without ever obscuring their precise message, nor does she use signifiers such as banners, slogans, or propaganda imagery.[7]

Alexander prefers to work with site-specific pieces, especially those with historical, social or spiritual resonances, and often produces work that can be interchangeable between different site-specific instillations.[2][6][15] Alexander does not place the work on a pedestal and avoids obvious barriers between the work and the viewer.[7][5] In the past, she was known for hauling rotting carcasses into her studio for her bones.[13] She casts or models her sculptures in plaster, builds them to the proportions of her friends and colleagues, and paints her modeled figures with oil paints. Other materials chosen are ceramic, fiberglass, animal bones and animal horns. She also uses found objects and materials in many of her pieces, such as shoes and clothing. One of her characters even wore an authentic South African prison uniform.[5][17]

Notable works[ edit ]

The Butcher Boys[edit]

During her master’s degree in 1985 and 1986, Alexander produced one of her most iconic artworks; The butcher boys.[8] The Butcher Boys is a plaster sculpture of three men with a grotesque appearance, all seated on a bench. The play comments on the bestiality and dehumanizing effects of violence in apartheid-era South Africa.[9][7] In an article in The New York Times, Holland Cotter describes that “their bodies, white-skinned and muscular, are magnificent but, with seams running from navel to throat, are also annoying”.[18] This line Cotter describes is a dark vertical scar suggesting that the larynx was removed, which would render any character unable to speak. The piece includes exposed backbones as well as various horns on each figure, all of which were used by animals.[5] The piece has one of the most widespread recognitions at the South African National Gallery.

Bom Boys[edit]

Formed in 1998, Bom Boys are a series of small, standing, gray-skinned characters.[13][16] Some figures are partially clothed and others are nude, and each wears a mask or blindfold.[13][8] They all face different directions, suggesting isolation and abandonment.[16] The figures in this work refer to the vulnerability of displaced children in Cape Town, which the artist herself observed while living there.[7][16][8] It is unclear whether the figures are predatory or hunted.[13]

African adventure[ edit ]

African Adventure by Jane Alexander, 1999-2002, Tate Modern, Bankside, London, England, November 2016

Produced in 1999-2002, African Adventure is a site-specific installation originally made for the British wardroom at the Castle of Good Hope in Cape Town and later installed at the Tate Modern. This piece contains thirteen humans, animals, and human-animal hybrids, as well as a large selection of found objects.[7][16] The bottom of the instillation is covered with red earth, and in the center is a half-naked man dragging various farming implements behind him, a burlap sack over his head and a machete in hand.[7] [16] This man could refer to Elias Xitavhudzi, a South African serial killer who murdered his victims with a machete. This piece is also intended to comment on colonialism, identity, democracy and the remnants of apartheid.[12][16]

The sacrifices of God are a troubled spirit[edit]

The Sacrifices of God are a Troubled Spirit was created in 2004 as a site-specific instillation for the world’s largest Gothic cathedral at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. Alexander’s was inspired by the cathedral’s architecture, as were the seventeen other artists who created works for this exhibition.[15] Alexander’s instillation includes six figures, including a lamb with scarecrow-like cane arms wearing a white dress, red gloves, blue rubber boots, and a crown of golden thorns, and a tall, slender human-animal hybrid figure holding a walking stick and wearing black boots , with a straight horn with a flag at the end and a horn curled in on itself on its antelope-like head.[15] There is also an ungulate with legs bound together carrying a battered-looking monkey on its back, a large ape figure with black boots and a jackal’s tail, a small four-legged animal, and a vulture-like figure with no wings or arms that has bloody feet.[15 ] All six figures stand together on plenty of red rubber gloves in front of a large painting in the cathedral.[19] This piece is based on Psalm 51, a prayer for the forgiveness of sins, with the lamb figure most likely symbolizing a sacrifice.[6][15]

Security with traffic (inflow control) [ edit ]

Security with traffic (inflow control), installation by Jane Alexander at CCCB, Barcelona 2007.

Within the triple barrier fence in Alexander’s 2007 play Security with traffic (influx control), dark earth is spread on the ground, partially covered by matches, sickles, gloves and inner tubes. There is also a diverse group of hybrid creations inside. Alexander created this piece in reference to a European Union-funded barrier erected by the Spanish government in Melilla that blocks access to EU territory.[7] This piece is also likely a commentary on migration, surveillance, land resources and ownership, and exploitation.[16]

Public exhibitions[ edit ]

Solo exhibitions[ edit ]

1986 Newtown, Johannesburg: Market Gallery [7]

1995 Grahamstown, South Africa: Monument Gallery [7]

1999 Cape Town: Irma Stern Museum, University of Cape Town [7]

2000 London: Gas Works [7]

2002 Stuttgart, Germany: DaimlerChrysler corporate headquarters, Forum Stuttgart-Moringen [7]

2005 Vienna: Kunsthalle Vienna [7]

2009 Durham, UK: Galilee Chapel, Durham Cathedral [7]

2009 New York: Gallery Jack Shainman [7]

2011 Brussels: La Centrale Electrique [7]

2012 New York: Museum of African Art[7]

Group shows[ edit ]

1994 Havana: Museo Nacional de Bellas Arte, 5th Havana Biennale [7]

1995 Venice: Palazzo Grassi, Venice Biennale [7]

1996 Berlin: House of World Cultures [7]

1996 Cape Town: Castle of Good Hope [7]

1997 Munich: Art Bureau [7]

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1998 Dakar, Senegal: Galerie Nationale, Dak’Art Biennale [7]

1998 Tokyo: Tobu Art Museum [7]

1999 Cape Town: The Granary [7]

1999 Accra, Ghana: Accra National Museum [7]

2000 Lyon, France: Halle Tony Garnier, Biennale de Lyon [7]

2000 Reykjavik: Reykjavik Art Museum [7]

2000 Cape Town: IDASA Gallery, Lecture. Thetha, Praat

2000 Havana: Centro De Arte Contemporaneo Wilfredp Lam, 7th Havana Biennial [7]

2000 London, British Museum [7]

2001 Munich: Museum Villa Stuck [7]

2001 Barcelona: Center de Cultura Contemorania de Barcelona [7]

2001 Madrid: Circulo de Bellas Artes [7]

2002 Paris: Maison Europeenne de la Photographie [7]

2002 Berlin: New Society for Fine Arts [7]

2003 Waltham, MA: Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University [7]

2003 Stockholm: NK car park [7]

2004 Cherleroi, Belgium: Palais des Beaux-Arts [7]

2004 Cape Town: Castle of Good Hope [7]

2004 Düsseldorf: Museum Kunstpalast [7]

2004 Tilburg, Netherlands: Oude Warande [7]

2004 New York: Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and Museum for African Art [7]

2005 North Adams, MA: Bulk MoCA [7]

2005 Bamako, Mali: National Museum of Mali [7]

2006 Ostend: Provincial Museum for Modern Art and the North Sea Cost of Belgium [7]

2006 Brussels: La Centrale Electrique [7]

2006 Singapore: City Hall, Singapore Biennale [7]

2006 Sao Paulo: Museu de Arte Moderna de Sao Paulo, Biennale de Sao Paulo [7]

2007 Gothenburg, Sweden: Roda Sten, International Biennale Gothenburg [7]

2007 Barcelona: Center de Cultura Contemprania de Barcelona [7]

2008 Johannesburg: FADA Gallery, University of Johannesburg [7]

2008 Polokwane, South Africa: Polowwane Art Museum [7]

2009 Havana: Convent of Saint Francis of Assisi, Havana Biennial [7]

2009 Johannesburg: Sandton Convention Center [7]

2009 Paris: Great Hall de La Villette [7]

2009 Khayelitsha, South Africa: Lookout Hill [7]

2009 Osaka Japan: Dojima River Forum, Dojima River Biennial [7]

2009 Tirana, Albania: Hotel Dajti, Tirana International Biennial of Contemporary Art [7]

2009 Cape Town: Spier [7]

2009 Cape Town: South African National Gallery [7]

2010 Cape Town: Cape Institute for Architecture [7]

2010 Cape Town: South African National Gallery [7]

2010 Cape Town: Michael Stevenson Gallery [7]

2010 Cradle of Humanity, Gauteng, South Africa: NIROX Sculpture Park [7]

2010 Helsinki: Art Museum Tennis Palace [7]

2010 Baltimore: Maryland Institute College of Art[7]

Awards[edit]

Jane Alexander has won multiple awards throughout her career as a solo and group artist. Alexander has exhibited work in several public collections including the South African National Gallery, Tatham Art Gallery, Johannesburg Art Gallery and the University of Witwatersrand Public Collection.[4]

Awards include:

1982 – National Prize for Fine Arts Students [11]

1982 – Martienssen Student Prize [20]

1995 – Standard Bank Young Artist Award [11]

1996 – Co-winner of the first National Bank Artist of the Year [20]

1996 – The FNB Vita Art Now Award [11]

2002 – DaimlerChrysler Prize [11]

2004 – University of Cape Town Scholarship[7]

Jane Alexander

This article is about the American actress. For other people with the same name, see Jane Alexander (disambiguation)

American actress

Jane Alexander (née Quigley; born October 28, 1939)[1] is an American actress and author. She has received two Primetime Emmy Awards, a Tony Award, and nominations for four Academy Awards and three Golden Globe Awards. From 1993 to 1997, Alexander served as Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Alexander won the 1969 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for her performance in the Broadway production of The Great White Hope. Other Broadway credits include 6 Rms Riv Vu (1972), The Night of the Iguana (1988), The Sisters Rosensweig (1993) and Honor (1998). She received a total of eight Tony Award nominations and was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 1994.[2]

Her film breakthrough came with the romantic drama The Great White Hope (1970), which earned her an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Her subsequent Academy Award nominations were for her roles in All the President’s Men (1976), Kramer vs. Kramer (1979), and Testament (1983). An eight-time Emmy nominee, she received her first nomination for playing Eleanor Roosevelt in Eleanor and Franklin (1976), a role for which she had to be between the ages of 18 and 60. She has won two Emmys for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie for Playing for Time (1980) and Warm Springs (2005).

Early life[edit]

Alexander was born Jane Quigley in Boston, Massachusetts to Ruth Elizabeth (née Pearson), a registered nurse, and Thomas B. Quigley, an orthopedic surgeon. She graduated from Beaver Country Day School, an all-girls school in Chestnut Hill outside of Boston, where she discovered her love for acting.[4]

Encouraged by her father to go to college before pursuing an acting career, Alexander attended Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, where she focused on theater but also studied math with computer programming in mind should she fail as an actress. Also during her time with Sarah Lawrence, she shared an apartment with Hope Cooke, who would become Queen Consort of Sikkim. Alexander spent her junior year at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland where she attended the Edinburgh University Dramatic Society. The experience cemented her determination to continue acting.[4]

Career [edit]

Alexander made her Broadway debut in 1963, replacing Phyllis Wynn as Sandy Dennis’ standby in A Thousand Clowns. She reportedly played the role a few times.[5] Alexander’s big break in acting came in 1967 when she played Eleanor Backman in the original production of Howard Sackler’s The Great White Hope at the Arena Stage in Washington, DC. Like her co-star James Earl Jones, she played the role both on Broadway (1968), for which she won a Tony Award, and in the film version (1970), for which she received an Oscar nomination.[6 ] See Alexander’s other screen credits include All the President’s Men (1976), Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) and Testament (1983), all of which earned her Oscar nominations, Brubaker (1980), The Cider House Rules (1999) and Fur (2006), in which she played Gertrude Nemerov, mother of Diane Arbus, played in the film by Nicole Kidman.

The play The Time of Your Life was revived at the Huntington Hartford Theater in Los Angeles on March 17, 1972, starring Alexander, Henry Fonda, Gloria Grahame, Lewis J. Stadlen, Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Thompson, Strother Martin, Richard X. Slattery, and Pepper Martin among the cast directed by Edwin Sherin.[7][8]

Alexander portrayed Eleanor Roosevelt in two television productions, Eleanor and Franklin (1976) and Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years (1977); She also played FDR’s mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt, in HBO’s Warm Springs (2005) with Kenneth Branagh and Cynthia Nixon, a role that earned her an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Alexander co-starred with Rachel Roberts in Steven Gether’s television play and production of A Circle of Children (1977), based on Mary MacCracken’s autobiographical book about emotionally disturbed children (with a focus on autism), which earned Gether an Emmy. Alexander also starred in the sequel Lovey: A Circle of Children, Part II (1978).

In 1979, the Supersisters trading card set was produced and distributed; one of the cards contained Alexander’s name and picture.[9]

Alexander’s other television films include Arthur Miller’s Playing for Time, starring Vanessa Redgrave, for which Alexander won another Emmy Award; Malice in Wonderland (as famous gossip Hedda Hopper); blood & orchids; and In Love and War (1987), starring James Woods, which tells the story of James and Sybil Stockdale during Stockdale’s eight-year US captivity in Vietnam. Alexander also played the protagonist Dr. May Foster on the HBO drama series Tell Me You Love Me. Her character, a psychotherapist, serves as a link between three couples struggling with relationship and sexual difficulties. The show’s overt depiction of “older” sexuality and explicit sex scenes caused controversy, although it received a rare endorsement from the AARP. She also had a supporting role as Dr. Graznik in The Ring.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed Alexander to chair the National Endowment for the Arts, the organization that had partially funded The Great White Hope at Arena Stage. Alexander moved to Washington, DC and served as NEA Chair until 1997. Her book Command Performance: an Actress in the Theater of Politics (2000) describes the challenges she faced in leading the NEA when the 104th US Congress, led by Newt Gingrich, endeavored unsuccessful in closing it.[4] In 1999 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[10]

In 2004, Alexander joined the theater department at Florida State University with her husband Edwin Sherin.[11] She serves on various bodies including the Wildlife Conservation Society, National Audubon Society, Project Greenhope, National Stroke Association and Women’s Action for Nuclear Disarmament, and has received the Israel Cultural Award and the Helen Caldicott Leadership Award. Alexander is also a Fellow of the International Leadership Forum.[13] In 2009, Alexander starred in Thom Thomas’ play A Moon to Dance By at the Pittsburgh Playhouse and the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Her husband Edwin Sherin directed the film.

Personal life[edit]

Alexander met her first husband, Robert Alexander, in New York City in the early 1960s, where both were pursuing acting careers. They had a son, Jace Alexander, in 1964 and the couple divorced a decade later. Alexander was a regular in various regional theaters when she met producer/director Edwin Sherin in Washington, DC where he was Artistic Director at Arena Stage. Alexander starred in the original theatrical production of The Great White Hope, directed by Sherin, on the Arena Stage prior to the play’s Broadway debut. The two became good friends and, after divorcing their respective spouses, became romantically involved and married in 1975. Together they have four children, Alexander’s son Jace and Sherin’s three sons Tony, Geoffrey and Jon. [4] Edwin Sherin died on May 4, 2017 at the age of 87.[14][15]

Filmography [ edit ]

Alexander in the 1960s

movie [edit]

television [edit]

stage [ edit ]

References[edit]

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