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How Long Does A Reed Last For A Saxophone? New

Let’s discuss the question: how long does a reed last for a saxophone. We summarize all relevant answers in section Q&A of website Abettes-culinary.com in category: MMO. See more related questions in the comments below.

How Long Does A Reed Last For A Saxophone
How Long Does A Reed Last For A Saxophone

How long do unused saxophone reeds last?

Reeds which you are actively using will likely last anywhere from 1-4 weeks provided you are playing regularly and taking good care of the reed. Whether or not a reed can expire depends also on how it is being stored as well as the extent to which the reed has had previous usage.

How often do you replace reeds?

You should turn the reeds every two to three weeks to keep the scent alive. Submerging them in the oil gives the dry ends the opportunity to absorb all they can, while the previously submerged bottom stands out and projects an immediately stronger scent. Turning the reeds frequently will not make them last longer.


How Often Should You Change A Reed

How Often Should You Change A Reed
How Often Should You Change A Reed

Images related to the topicHow Often Should You Change A Reed

How Often Should You Change A Reed
How Often Should You Change A Reed

How do you know when to change a saxophone reed?

If you’re noticing that the tip of your saxophone reed is chipped, it may be time for a replacement. In some cases, chipped tips won’t affect playing, while in other instances chipped reed tips will make the reed completely unplayable. To verify the extent of the damage, observe where the tip is chipped.

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How often do you have to change the reed on an alto saxophone?

That works out to be about one every two to three weeks, BUT instead of having only one playable reed, I have 4-5. And that’s with Rico Jazz Selects (which are notoriously short-lived). I’ve switched to Superial DC’s now, and hopefully they last MUCH LONGER!

How long can you use a reed for?

If you play your instrument frequently, 3 weeks use out of one reed is usually the limit. You will start to find that a reed will start to go bad when it starts to squeak frequently, sounds like it’s on the verge of squeaking, is starting to fray or curl in on the sides of the reed, or is starting to chip.

How long are reeds good for?

A good rule of thumb is you should replace your reed every 2-4 weeks, no matter how often you’re playing your instrument. You may want to replace your reeds more frequently if you’re practicing several hours each day. Some reeds also may not last as long as others, every reed plays slightly differently.

How long should an alto sax reed last?

Expect a reed to last for around a week to two weeks. When you change from a reed you’ve been using for some time to a new reed, the sound of your instrument will change with it.

Can you reuse reed sticks?

Can you reuse diffuser reeds? Essentially no, reeds in a diffuser need to be replaced for use with a new, different scent otherwise you will not get a pure smell of the new fragrance through the reeds.

Why does my reed turn black?

Black is mold. too much moisture start by leaving your reed case open so you won’t trap humidity. Throw away any reeds in your case, clean it well, and disinfect it… rubbing alcohol soak would do the trick.


How Long Does a Synthetic Saxophone Reed Last? What to do When it’s Too Soft or Too Hard

How Long Does a Synthetic Saxophone Reed Last? What to do When it’s Too Soft or Too Hard
How Long Does a Synthetic Saxophone Reed Last? What to do When it’s Too Soft or Too Hard

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Images related to the topicHow Long Does a Synthetic Saxophone Reed Last? What to do When it’s Too Soft or Too Hard

How Long Does A Synthetic Saxophone Reed Last? What To Do When It'S Too Soft Or Too Hard
How Long Does A Synthetic Saxophone Reed Last? What To Do When It’S Too Soft Or Too Hard

How can you tell if a reed is bad?

Old reeds that play mushy you should throw out. New reeds that play mushy, Clip. New reeds that play stiff, sand a little to soften. New reeds that play right out of the box.

When should you throw away reeds?

There are some reeds that don’t sound great but play well enough to use for practice so you can save your good ones for performance. But if the reed is to hard or has gone soft or is dead or dying where it just doesn’t want to vibrate anymore, then it’s best to throw it away.

How often should I clean my saxophone?

You should clean your saxophone out with a swab at least once per day, immediately after you finish practicing. The mouthpiece should be cleaned once per month with lukewarm water and soap, and you should use a soft polish cloth on the body of the saxophone about once per week or as needed.

When should I get a new reed?

The best rule of thumb that I can offer is: if it feels good, if it is easy to play, if it doesn’t squeak and squawk, if it isn’t cracked or broken or fury or gross, if you can control it and get it to do what you want you want it to – then keep using it.

Can you play with a chipped reed?

You can play on a chipped reed if it’s not chipped too bad. But, the damage to the reed will affect the sound. It is not advisable to use chipped reeds because in some cases, it will destroy the sound of your reed instrument or it will be completely unplayable. It is normal for a reed to expire.

How do I make my saxophone reed last longer?

Make your saxophone reed last longer by using a reed guard or reed case. By storing your reed carefully, you can extend the life of your reed and save a lot of money! Storing your reed on your mouthpiece or loose in the instrument case will make it more likely that your reed will get chipped or damaged.

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How often should I change my reed sticks?

A good quality reed will last approximately six months. If the fragrance is no longer as strong as it once was, try flipping the reeds. Over time, the reeds will become saturated and can get clogged with dust. When this happens, it is time to replace the reeds.

Do reeds go bad?

But reeds do continue to age, and there is a point that a reed will age too far to be worth playing. I would say at least a year before this starts happening though. I think reeds are like wine: They improve somewhat with age, but if you leave it too long you are practically drinking vinegar.


How to Choose the Right Saxophone Reed

How to Choose the Right Saxophone Reed
How to Choose the Right Saxophone Reed

Images related to the topicHow to Choose the Right Saxophone Reed

How To Choose The Right Saxophone Reed
How To Choose The Right Saxophone Reed

How do I keep my reed from molding?

How to Prevent Mold from Happening
  1. Make sure your reeds are really dry before storing them.
  2. Use a well-ventilated reed case (I have been using an altoids case with three holes drilled in it for over a decade)

How long do you soak a reed?

You should soak your reeds for about one minute with saliva. This ensures that the reed is moist enough to play well without being so wet that it becomes waterlogged. If the reed is brand new, you may want to soak it more thoroughly with water for about twenty minutes before working with it.

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